St. Jude Medical Pacemakers & ICDs

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Posted by admin on 2012-09-16 21:58. 4 comments. 1555 reads
 
AIGISRx Antibacterial Envelope for Pacemakers and Defibrillators Recognized by Frost & Sullivan

Monmouth Junction, NJ (September 14, 2012) – TYRX, Inc., the leader in the commercialization of implantable medical devices designed to help reduce surgical-site infections associated with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) including pacemakers and implantable defibrillators, announced today that Frost & Sullivan has named the AIGISRx Antibacterial Envelope as the recipient of its prestigious New Product Innovation Award for 2012.

“To date TYRX’s AIGISRx is very unique in the fact that it is the first and only antibacterial product of its kind to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance. ...


Posted by admin on 2012-08-21 21:56. 8 comments. 1267 reads
 
Over 50% of Hospital CFOs Plan to Adopt New Technology in Response to Medicare Cuts for Cardiac Device Infections

-- National Survey Shows that Cardiac Device Infections Will Have a Significant Financial Impact NowThat Medicare Will No Longer Reimburse --

Monmouth Junction, NJ (August 20, 2012): Medicare’s decision to stop reimbursing hospitals for the treatment of potentially avoidable surgical site infections following cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) procedures, including pacemaker and defibrillator implants, will significantly impact hospital practices according to a new national survey of hospital chief financial officers (CFOs).

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently...


Posted by admin on 2012-08-10 14:03. 4 comments. 1542 reads
 
TYRX Comments on Medicare Decision to Stop Paying for Infections Following Pacemaker or Defibrillator Implants

Monmouth Junction, NJ (August 2, 2012): In a bid to help control health care costs, on October 1, 2012, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will stop paying
hospitals for treating potentially avoidable surgical site infections following Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device (CIED) procedures including pacemaker and defibrillator implants. CMS just released its Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) Final Rule for Fiscal Year 2013 which adds Surgical Site Infection following CIED implantation as a condition subject to the Hospital Acquired Cndition payment provision. CMS considers thes...


Posted by ldebaugh on 2012-07-25 13:06. 1 comments. 903 reads
 
Here's an article about a new type of mapping and ablation of the heart that has better success than traditional mapping and ablation for reducing atrial fibrillation. This might improve things for a lot of us.

http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/HRS/26336

When new knowledge is found it always amazes me how this is still a new field of medicine and there's a lot we don't know yet. Our grandkids will look back on this time where we were the pioneers (or lab rats) for these new procedures.


Posted by admin on 2012-04-09 20:53. 5 comments. 992 reads
 
TYRX Announces Launch of New Patient Education Web Site
HeartDeviceInfection.com

Monmouth Junction, NJ (February 28, 2012) – TYRX , Inc., the leader in the commercialization of implantable medical devices designed to help reduce surgical-site infections, today announced the launch of its new patient education web site, HeartDeviceInfection.com.

HeartDeviceInfection.com, targeting patients and caregivers, has been created to raise awareness of surgical site infection associated with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) including pacemakers and implantable defibrillators, and to offer information and resources for reducing that risk.

“With CIED infections growing much faster than implantations,...


Posted by ROSCO on 2012-04-07 18:17. 0 comments. 684 reads
 
Very interesting article here about the Riata a St. Jude defib lead . http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/07/health/flaws-in-st-jude-heart-defibrillator-shake-the-industry.html

Posted by admin on 2012-04-01 20:50. 1 comments. 795 reads
 
BIOTRONIK, a leading manufacturer of implantable cardiac devices and pioneer of wireless remote monitoring technologies, today announced that baseball legend and Hall of Famer Tommy Lasorda has been named BIOTRONIK’s new Brand Ambassador. Lasorda and BIOTRONIK will conduct educational outreach programs starting with a pilot program in Phoenix, Arizona on March 28th, 2012.

Read the article at http://www.financialpost.com/markets/news/
BIOTRONIK+NAMES+Baseball+Legend+Hall+Famer+Tommy+
LASORDA+BRAND/6364909/story.html

Posted by agelbert on 2012-04-01 19:21. 2 comments. 1492 reads
 
Hi everyone. I just got htis bit of info about clinical trials for a "new" device.
Here's a snippet from the article:
[In patients with heart failure, the nervous system is out of balance, and this imbalance increases workload on the heart. The CardioFit system is intended to restore this imbalance by stimulating the vagus nerve in the neck to treat a specific part of the nervous system that is not treatable with current medical therapies. The CardioFit system consists of a stimulator, a sensor lead and a stimulation lead, which are implanted under the skin of the chest. Once activated, the stimulator's electrical pulses are transferred via the stimulation lead to the vagus nerve in the neck. Like a pacemaker, the CardioFit Syst...


Posted by ReneeV2.0 on 2012-03-30 22:41. 7 comments. 1887 reads
 
Just found this article and I thought I would share :)

"An initial study of the iPhone ECG – which we’ve covered since its popular YouTube video was released last year – was presented at this past week’s American College of Cardiology 61st Annual Scientific Sessions in Chicago. The highly anticipated device is pending FDA approval, though questions have abounded about how exactly it will be applied. For example, will it predominantly be used by patients, emergency responders, and/or clinicians, and what diagnostically useful information can be obtained from it?

Entitled “iPhone Rhythm Strip: Clinical Implications of Wireless and Ubiquitous Heart Rate Monitoring,” the new 8-week study enrolled 54 participants and has b...


Posted by admin on 2012-03-14 21:46. 5 comments. 1186 reads
 
The mini gadget is made by global health care firm Medtronic, which has a base in Watford, Herts.

The company’s Dr Stephen Oesterle said: “It can be implanted via a catheter in a five to 10 minute procedure. It is quicker, easier, less invasive and cheaper and will be trialed later this year.

Read the article at
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/technology-science/
science/heart-pacemaker-the-size-of-a-tic-tac-758476

Posted by admin on 2012-03-13 21:17. 8 comments. 795 reads
 
A heart device might save your life but leave you miserable. That awful possibility is the reason for new advice urging doctors to talk more honestly with people who have very weak hearts and are considering pumps, pacemakers, new valves or procedures to open clogged arteries.

Too often, patients with advanced heart failure don't realize what they are getting into when they agree to a treatment, and doctors assume they want everything possible done to keep them alive, says the new advice, published Monday by the American Heart Association and endorsed by other medical groups.

It calls for shared decision making when patients face a chronic condition that often proves fatal and they need to figure out what they really ...


Posted by bredren on 2012-03-06 18:08. 4 comments. 1153 reads
 
Some good news for anyone thinking of buying a body fat scale. As some of you might know, they send an electrical signal through your body to determine your body fat. Because of this, many manufacturers strongly suggest people with pacemakers or ICDs should not use their product.

I bought a Withing body fat scale and tested it with a technician at my ICD clinic. Worked like a charm. No inappropriate shock or even a surge of electrical charge (it must be very small).

Withing makes a really advance, internet-enabled scale. While it may not be for everyone, I love it.

FYI I have a St Jude Medical ICD implanted. Can't speak for other devices.

Posted by bon on 2012-03-02 23:05. 9 comments. 1116 reads
 
Does anyone have experience with the PM that you can still have an MRI with? I have a brain issue that is monitored with periodic MRI. I thought MRI would not be possible after I get a pacemaker, but the MRI tech told me during my MRI today that they make a PM that you can still have an MRI with. probably will get my PM in the next few weeks and would like to explore options.

Posted by admin on 2012-02-08 21:46. 1 comments. 827 reads
 
Women who have defibrillators implanted for heart problems are more likely to develop complications than men, a Canadian study suggests.

Men and women were equally likely to have cardioverter-defibrillators or ICDs implanted. But women were nearly twice as likely to have major complications within a year of getting the devices, according to the study in Monday's issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The defibrillators are implanted in people who are at risk of sudden cardiac death because of heart rhythm disorders. The devices work by recognizing serious heart rhythm problems and treating them automatically such as by giving an electrical shock.

Women were a third less likely to receive an appropriate s...


Posted by admin on 2012-02-08 21:38. 4 comments. 1120 reads
 
Though pacemakers require only small amounts of energy (about 1 millionth of a Watt), their batteries have to be replaced periodically, which means multiple surgeries for patients. Researchers have searched for ways to prolong battery life – trying to generate energy to power a pacemaker using blood sugar, or the motion of the hands and legs – but these methods either interfere with metabolism or require a more drastic surgery, such as passing a wire from the limbs to the chest area. Aerospace engineers from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor have developed a prototype device that could power a pacemaker using a source that is surprisingly close to the heart of the matter: vibrations in the chest cavity that are due mainly to heartbea...


Posted by admin on 2012-02-01 20:57. 0 comments. 547 reads
 
Hugo Campos has a small computer buried in his chest to help keep him alive. But he has no idea what it says about his faulty heart.

All the raw data it collects, especially any erratic rhythms it controls with shocks, goes directly to the manufacturer. And some of it later gets sent to his doctor.

But Campos had to step onto a national stage in his fight to see the data his body produces.

His David-and-Goliath campaign puts him on the leading edge of what's called the "e-patient movement" -- "engaged, equipped and enabled" -- that seeks to harness data so patients can learn more about their bodies.

Read the entire article at:
http://www.mercurynews.com/health/ci_19847981

Posted by admin on 2012-01-31 22:07. 0 comments. 699 reads
 
Medtronic, a major med-tech company, is hoping that the next big thing will actually be small and cheap: a pacemaker for developing countries.

Read the article at http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/
a-foothold-for-healthtech-ultra-cheap-pacemakers/

Posted by brokenheart on 2012-01-27 00:35. 6 comments. 879 reads
 
Hey has any one seen the possible new tiny pacemaker medtronic is working on? It is about the size of a vitamin tablet and needs no leads..it just directly stimulates the heart. Says it is still in testing stages but can be in the market in 5 years or so. Sounds nice...but i wonder would any one prefer to have a tiny pacer and when you need a new one keep pilling these around your heart? Or keep the regular pacer and keep changing the battery every 5-10 yrs?

Posted by admin on 2012-01-19 15:24. 0 comments. 706 reads
 
To capitalize on growing demand from international markets, St. Jude Medical (NYSE:STJ) is launching a new MR-Conditional pacemaker in India that will allow patients implanted with such a pacemaker to undergo a full-body MRI scan safely.

The Accent MRI pacemaker, among St. Jude’s roster of new innovative medical devices, is the first MR-Conditional pacemaker to allow a high-resolution, full-body scan without compromising the patient’s safety, said a St. Jude spokeswoman.

To learn more: visit:

http://www.medcitynews.com/2012/01/
st-jude-medical-launches-new-mr-conditional-pacemaker-
in-india/?edition=minnesota

Posted by admin on 2012-01-19 15:13. 0 comments. 550 reads
 
An irregular heartbeat that isn't felt but is detected by a pacemaker may point to an increased risk of stroke, a new study suggests.

The study in Wednesday's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine looked at 2, 580 people aged 65 or older with hypertension and no history of a type of irregular heartbeat called atrial tachyarrhythmia.

For more details visit:
www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/01/11/
stroke-pacemaker-silent-atrial-fibrillation.html



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