St. Jude Medical Pacemakers & ICDs

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Posted by admin on 2012-03-13 21:17. 8 comments. 683 reads
 
A heart device might save your life but leave you miserable. That awful possibility is the reason for new advice urging doctors to talk more honestly with people who have very weak hearts and are considering pumps, pacemakers, new valves or procedures to open clogged arteries.

Too often, patients with advanced heart failure don't realize what they are getting into when they agree to a treatment, and doctors assume they want everything possible done to keep them alive, says the new advice, published Monday by the American Heart Association and endorsed by other medical groups.

It calls for shared decision making when patients face a chronic condition that often proves fatal and they need to figure out what they really ...


Posted by bredren on 2012-03-06 18:08. 4 comments. 916 reads
 
Some good news for anyone thinking of buying a body fat scale. As some of you might know, they send an electrical signal through your body to determine your body fat. Because of this, many manufacturers strongly suggest people with pacemakers or ICDs should not use their product.

I bought a Withing body fat scale and tested it with a technician at my ICD clinic. Worked like a charm. No inappropriate shock or even a surge of electrical charge (it must be very small).

Withing makes a really advance, internet-enabled scale. While it may not be for everyone, I love it.

FYI I have a St Jude Medical ICD implanted. Can't speak for other devices.

Posted by bon on 2012-03-02 23:05. 9 comments. 948 reads
 
Does anyone have experience with the PM that you can still have an MRI with? I have a brain issue that is monitored with periodic MRI. I thought MRI would not be possible after I get a pacemaker, but the MRI tech told me during my MRI today that they make a PM that you can still have an MRI with. probably will get my PM in the next few weeks and would like to explore options.

Posted by admin on 2012-02-08 21:46. 1 comments. 721 reads
 
Women who have defibrillators implanted for heart problems are more likely to develop complications than men, a Canadian study suggests.

Men and women were equally likely to have cardioverter-defibrillators or ICDs implanted. But women were nearly twice as likely to have major complications within a year of getting the devices, according to the study in Monday's issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The defibrillators are implanted in people who are at risk of sudden cardiac death because of heart rhythm disorders. The devices work by recognizing serious heart rhythm problems and treating them automatically such as by giving an electrical shock.

Women were a third less likely to receive an appropriate s...


Posted by admin on 2012-02-08 21:38. 4 comments. 894 reads
 
Though pacemakers require only small amounts of energy (about 1 millionth of a Watt), their batteries have to be replaced periodically, which means multiple surgeries for patients. Researchers have searched for ways to prolong battery life – trying to generate energy to power a pacemaker using blood sugar, or the motion of the hands and legs – but these methods either interfere with metabolism or require a more drastic surgery, such as passing a wire from the limbs to the chest area. Aerospace engineers from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor have developed a prototype device that could power a pacemaker using a source that is surprisingly close to the heart of the matter: vibrations in the chest cavity that are due mainly to heartbea...


Posted by admin on 2012-02-01 20:57. 0 comments. 449 reads
 
Hugo Campos has a small computer buried in his chest to help keep him alive. But he has no idea what it says about his faulty heart.

All the raw data it collects, especially any erratic rhythms it controls with shocks, goes directly to the manufacturer. And some of it later gets sent to his doctor.

But Campos had to step onto a national stage in his fight to see the data his body produces.

His David-and-Goliath campaign puts him on the leading edge of what's called the "e-patient movement" -- "engaged, equipped and enabled" -- that seeks to harness data so patients can learn more about their bodies.

Read the entire article at:
http://www.mercurynews.com/health/ci_19847981

Posted by admin on 2012-01-31 22:07. 0 comments. 517 reads
 
Medtronic, a major med-tech company, is hoping that the next big thing will actually be small and cheap: a pacemaker for developing countries.

Read the article at http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/
a-foothold-for-healthtech-ultra-cheap-pacemakers/

Posted by brokenheart on 2012-01-27 00:35. 6 comments. 718 reads
 
Hey has any one seen the possible new tiny pacemaker medtronic is working on? It is about the size of a vitamin tablet and needs no leads..it just directly stimulates the heart. Says it is still in testing stages but can be in the market in 5 years or so. Sounds nice...but i wonder would any one prefer to have a tiny pacer and when you need a new one keep pilling these around your heart? Or keep the regular pacer and keep changing the battery every 5-10 yrs?

Posted by admin on 2012-01-19 15:24. 0 comments. 548 reads
 
To capitalize on growing demand from international markets, St. Jude Medical (NYSE:STJ) is launching a new MR-Conditional pacemaker in India that will allow patients implanted with such a pacemaker to undergo a full-body MRI scan safely.

The Accent MRI pacemaker, among St. Jude’s roster of new innovative medical devices, is the first MR-Conditional pacemaker to allow a high-resolution, full-body scan without compromising the patient’s safety, said a St. Jude spokeswoman.

To learn more: visit:

http://www.medcitynews.com/2012/01/
st-jude-medical-launches-new-mr-conditional-pacemaker-
in-india/?edition=minnesota

Posted by admin on 2012-01-19 15:13. 0 comments. 438 reads
 
An irregular heartbeat that isn't felt but is detected by a pacemaker may point to an increased risk of stroke, a new study suggests.

The study in Wednesday's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine looked at 2, 580 people aged 65 or older with hypertension and no history of a type of irregular heartbeat called atrial tachyarrhythmia.

For more details visit:
www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/01/11/
stroke-pacemaker-silent-atrial-fibrillation.html

Posted by tampasailor on 2012-01-15 16:13. 2 comments. 597 reads
 
Apparently recent advancements in this are very promising and 5 Universities in US now heavily involved with much success. I am looking into the possibilities. Anyone else? Any experience?
Here is a good place to start looking.

http://bit.ly/w1v1lD

Its Google links on the subject.

Please share here if you can.

rgds, lyman

Posted by Vmurph on 2012-01-12 23:12. 13 comments. 631 reads
 

Saw my EP on Tuesday. He spent 3 full mins with me, wants me to go back to work part time. My pm showed a flutter and hr of 185 at rest.  He said those were no big deal.  Are they?  I’m not sure of the flutter, not sure they have ever seen a flutter before. Or if they have, I was not aware?

He said the fatigue I have he wants me to work through it and start exercising. He was in and out in a whirlwind. I didn’t get a chance to ask any questions.  I wish I would have asked him how much I am using my pm. It was 50% right after surgery.  

I can feel when it paces and it’s a lot. Still haven’t received Merlin yet.  I’m ready to go back to work mentally, b...



Posted by admin on 2012-01-04 21:15. 3 comments. 513 reads
 
I found this story and thought others may also find it inspiring.

http://www.birminghammail.net/news/top-stories/2011/12/31/
stechford-pacemaker-baby-all-grown-up-after-defying-
doctors-and-battling-heart-condition-97319-30036946/



Posted by SMITTY on 2012-01-01 13:58. 1 comments. 750 reads
 
When you have nothing better to do and would like to read the History of Pacemakers (and defibrillators I found out) log in to this site http://www.biotele.com/pacemakers.htm

I do not know the author and do not even know where I got the address, but it is a very interesting article (23 pages) on the development of the pacemaker and defibrillators starting in the 1700s. In this article the story ends in the 1960s. But it makes me appreciate even more the advances made in pacemakers before I got my first one.

Posted by Parrothead57 on 2011-12-13 15:33. 3 comments. 1281 reads
 
Medtronic To Pay $23.5M To Settle Kickback Claims

http://click.mail.advantagebusinessmedia.com/?qs=45998b434d4eb99202b2d57c53e5b88ab2118919479ef734af050dcb022d7e84

December 13, 2011

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The U.S. Justice Department says Medtronic Inc. has agreed to pay $23.5 million to settle allegations that the company paid kickbacks to doctors to implant its pacemakers and defibrillators.

The government alleged that Medtronic caused false claims to be submitted to Medicare and Medicaid by using two post-market studies and two device registries as vehicles to pay illegal kickbacks to doctors.

Each of the studies and registries required a new or previous implant of a Medtronic device in ...


Posted by Selwyn on 2011-10-14 08:50. 2 comments. 1378 reads
 
Warning!!! following a software update the new battery impedance elective replacement indicator theshold may trigger an unexpected ERI in this device and En Rhythm MRI devices. - patients should have a recall visit if have had software update , or if update in future regular reviews etc.

( NHS medical device alert issed 28th Sept )

Futher info. Phone Dr Dunham 01923 212 213 ( UK)



Posted by janetinak on 2011-09-28 13:41. 9 comments. 665 reads
 
Local paper has an obit for the inventer of the PM., Wilson Greenbatch 92, died in Buffalo, NY died Tuesday according to the Associated Press.1st implantable PM placed in 1960 & 77 yr old recepient lived 18 month. Interesting article.

Janet

Posted by polaris on 2011-07-17 17:28. 1 comments. 999 reads
 
Anyone know what's going on with this Guidant class action in Canada lately?

Is it even GOING on any more? the Kim Orr site has not been updated on this matter for well over a year. That cannot be encouraging news in and of itself. If progress were being made, we'd hear more, no?

I suffered a great deal from an infected lead from a Guidant pacemaker, losing months of my life because of this horrible experience. I'd like to see this suite come to a satisfactory conclusion in a timely manner [as I said, if it's even HAPPENING any more].

Posted by Ivana on 2011-05-11 14:34. 0 comments. 606 reads
 
from The Associated Press Posted: May 11, 2011 11:52 AM ET

Medtronic's cold heart treatment gets federal OK.

The world's largest medical device maker said the Arctic Front system treats a type of irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation. It uses cold to destroy some tissue, creating lesions around the pulmonary vein, the source of the signals that cause the irregular heartbeat.

Minneapolis-based Medtronic acquired the Arctic Front system in November 2008, when it bought Montreal-based heart device maker CryoCath in a deal valued at about $380 million.

Atrial fibrillation is a condition in which the upper chambers of the heart do not beat in sync with the lower chambers.



Posted by sereimund on 2011-04-09 23:02. 5 comments. 867 reads
 
So today I was trying to look to see if medtronic has a bi-ventricular pacemaker and while doing that I found out that they have a device called Revo MRI Sure Scan Pacing System. You can actually get an MRI with this impant. I just thought that was interesting because if for some reason you have something wrong with you that would need an MRI. Now you can actually get one.



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