Operating a Lawn Mower Just Weeks After BV ICD Implant Surgery

This is kind of a follow up to my earlier post on operating a lawn mower or weed whacker. I am over three weeks post surgery and my grass is growing fast. I want to cut it, but discharge instructions said no lifting anything over ten pounds for six weeks. Does anyone know if operating a lawn mower too early would be an issue? Not sure if pulling and pushing would be the same as lifting? Is the lifting a concern with the leads pulling out, or is it a concern with the incision opening up? Thanks. 


6 Comments

restrictions

by Tracey_E - 2019-05-11 15:29:39

Restrictions are for the leads. I think that pushing/pulling would be the same as lifting, yes, so I'd call the doctor and ask.

RE restrictions

by davbrn1765 - 2019-05-11 15:50:43

Thanks for your comment. I forgot to ask the doctor about the specifics of the lifting restrictions when it came to pulling or pushing something. My first pacemaker was done earlier in the year when I didn't have to worry about yard work. Thanks again for your quick response.

Yeah, I'd hold off

by Theknotguy - 2019-05-12 07:40:28

There is a lot of healing of the underlying tissue that goes on even after the surface skin has healed.  If you push it too hard you pull that tissue and you can lengthen the amount of time it takes your pacemaker pocket to heal.  I started too early, threw the ball for the dog and really pulled something in the pacemaker pocket.  It took another six weeks for the area I pulled to heal.   Didn't bother the leads or anything like that.  And it was really sore during that time. 

I'd offer one of your neighbors a six pack of his favorite beer.  Or maybe get a half case of beer and offer that in payment.  He'll probably do your lawn for the next eight weeks.  Or if you're really lucky and you've got an enterprising kid in the neighborhood, I'd offer him minimum wage for doing your lawn.  Just make sure you tell him the max amount before he does the work.  He'll probably be willing to do your lawn for the entire summer.

I haven't been bothered by any machinery except for a sawz-all reciprocating saw.  The vibration makes my pacemaker think I'm running and it kicks up my heart rate.  Same for riding in larger trucks if I'm not driving.  Bouncing around does the same thing.  Other than that I can run any machinery I'd like.  I do my lawn and the trimming.  Also work at a charity wood shop and run all the equipment there.  So you should be good to go for that.

Hope everything else is going well for you.  
 

no, no, no

by ROBO Pop - 2019-05-12 10:21:18

My Cardiologist told me once you have one of these medical miracles implanted you should never do household chores again. Hand those tasks off to your significant other.

Both my wife and his nurse opinions on that topic differed...slightly.

Come on, don't over play this. If you feel up to it the go for it. Your body will guide you. Don't look for reasons not to get back to living.

Why Chance it?

by Swangirl - 2019-05-12 12:52:17

Getting your leads to settle in successfully is extremely important.  Broken or misplaced leads will be a hugh problem you don't want to chance.  It will require more complicated surgery.  Please be patient and let your body do it's thing.  I hired my neighbor's gardener to keep my yard up until I was back in action.  Be sensible and wait.

At seven weeks...

by AgentX86 - 2019-05-12 19:53:20

...I'd try just about anything short of swinging a golf club or some such.  The key is to take it easy.  Do a little bit one day and see how you feel the next.  If you're OK, crank it up some.  If not, scale it back some more and try again in a few weeks.  As others have said, the worst thing you can possibly do is nothing.  You really do need to move your arm but don't be surprised if you can't do what you did before the implant.  Sneak up on your limits.  You don't want to exceed them for a while.  I wouldn't worry about pulling your leads loose unless you doing some excessive stretching.  Just digging and cutting up wood with a chain saw should be fine (though you may get really sore).  When in doubt, ask your EP (or his nurse).

 

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