pulled both leads out

I had pm pu in last thursday. when I woke up on tuesday morning my sling had ripped and my arm was over my head. I didn't think too much about it and sewed the sling. that evening I had huge muscle spasms on my right side. after calling the surgeon I went to the hospital and found out that I had pulled one lead out 2" and the other one out 6". had surgery to put them back and now he has me on a very restricted regimen. I'm really scared but know I have to be careful.
judy


5 Comments

pulled leads

by CathrynB - 2007-08-10 07:08:13

Hey Judy,
I'm so sorry to hear you had such a rotten complication following your implant and had to have a second surgery -- that's awful. About 2 weeks after my implant in January I woke up in the middle of the night with my left arm flung over my head. I panicked until I realized my pulse was fine, no symptoms had returned and I felt great. But after that I tied a sash around my waist at bedtime, a shoestring around my wrist, and tied the shoestring to the sash, giving me only about 12 inches of movement in my left arm so it would be impossible to get it over my head in my sleep. I didn't pull a lead, but I felt lucky.
I hope your recovery this time around goes smoothly with no more problems. And yes, it is important to be careful, but you know that better than anyone at this point!
Take care and keep us posted on how you're doing,
Cathryn

You're very fortunate

by Surferman - 2007-08-10 11:08:32

Hi Judy,
Like Cathryn, I, too, lifted my left arm, sling and all, over my head the second night after surgery but I didn't harm the leads. It is frightening when one does that because it could lead to a life threatening situation. Cathryn's suggestion about tying the arm to a sash is a good one. I didn't do that but I did put a pillow under my left arm and put the arm in the sling on top of it; it raised the arm to torso height and seemed took the pressure off the shoulder durng the night; that way, the arm wasn't hanging from the shoulder putting pressure on the shoulder joint. Don't elevate too high; push the pillow down so it's even with your torso. A feather pillow works better than a foam one because it's not so resilient. It helped provide me with a better night's sleep while I had to wear the sling.
Good luck and take it easy; be patient with yourself
and your healing. Keep us posted. Surferman

Be careful!

by bambi - 2007-08-10 11:08:40

It's so tempting to want to throw our arm up over our heads when we sleep! I'm so sorry your safety net [the sling], failed to do its job! Kinda like a parachute that doesn't open! Ha! Please be careful this time so you can start recovering! Take care!
Bambi

i used ...

by queen_beez - 2007-08-11 04:08:42

a safety pin attached to the sling and the bed or pillow case ,whichever seems more comfortable. When you go to move it above it will wake you up. As long as your not taking too many of those pain meds. HAHA. Good luck this time around. And like the others sorry you had to go through this all over again.
Susan

Another option

by janetinak - 2007-08-12 02:08:32

After my PM insertions (2 now) my doc had me wear a support that is used for people that need to keep their arm down like we do after insertion. It is an orthopedic support made of heavy duty material & anchors the upper arm & lower arm to the support with velcro. The nurse in the PCU said he was very glad my doc used this support as when we lay down the sling is useless as you have found out. It was easier to get used to this night support & use a regular sling in the day time & let gravity work.

Hope this helps.

Janet

You know you're wired when...

You are always wired and full of energy.

Member Quotes

It is just over 10 years since a dual lead device was implanted for complete heart block. It has worked perfectly and I have traveled well near two million miles internationally since then.